Kibera Public Space Project

Kibera Public Space Project (KPSP) has been selected as one of five finalists for the 2020-2021 Prize for Cities competition hosted by the World Resource Institute (WRI) Ross Centre for Sustainable Cities.

The KPSP project is co-creating innovative spaces with residents that not only reduce flood risk but provide essential services, like water and sanitation, and new ways for businesses to thrive.

“The Kibera Public Space Project provides a model for sustainable development that addresses a range of objectives in a cohesive way, not only recreational public space, but also economic development and environmental remediation,” Regina Opondo, community director, Kounkuey Design Initiative Nairobi Office said.

“With public spaces that provide access to safe and affordable water, sanitation, flood protection, and income-generating opportunities for tens of thousands of Kibera residents, KPSP builds resilience to climate risks in the most vulnerable neighbourhoods,” she added.

This year’s Prize for Cities competition drew more than 260 applications from around the world with the five finalists being selected from Argentina, India, Kenya, Mexico and the UK.

The WRI Ross Centre for Sustainable Cities is a programme run by the World Resources Institute (WRI), a global research organization that spans more than 60 countries.

WRI said the finalists show that cities can be more sustainable and productive for more residents through empowering, participatory and climate-smart changes.

“In an extraordinarily challenging year, these projects show the resilience and creativity of cities– that partnership between community groups, government and business can lead to significant change with multiple co-benefits,” said Ani Dasgupta, global director, WRI Ross Centre for Sustainable Cities.

“These types of innovations are more important than ever, as cities are a crucial building block in an inclusive, resilient recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic,” said the statement from WRI.

“As cities seek new solutions to jumpstart their economies and become more resilient, these projects show how we can build cities that work better for people and the planet,” Dasgupta said.

The finalists will be evaluated by an independent jury of urban thinkers and leaders from outside WRI who will determine the winner of the grand prize of $250,000. The four runners up will each receive $25,000.

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